Matt Bevin

Ryland Barton/WFPL

  Governor Andy Beshear will not move forward with former Governor Matt Bevin’s controversial changes to Kentucky’s Medicaid program. Beshear made the announcement Monday, within his first week in office.

Beshear said he’s sending a letter to federal officials to rescind the 1115 waiver that Bevin first submitted back in 2016. He also signed an executive order repealing Bevin’s signature health policy.

Beshear/Coleman2019

This interview was originally published on May 23, 2019.

The Attorney General and 2019 Democratic Gubernatorial candidate tells WEKU's Wendy Barnett his plans for the months leading up to the fall elections in this in-depth exclusive interview.

Incumbent Governor Matt Bevin spoke to WEKU here

You can also stay informed with our WEKU App.  

  Kentucky’s governor is the most powerful official in state government. The governor is in charge of managing the agencies that make up the various components of state government like health care, corrections, education and transportation.

The governor also plays an important role in crafting the state’s laws and spending plan, sometimes crafting bills and budgets for the legislature to consider or advocating for new laws. Once a bill passes out of the legislature, the governor can sign it into law or veto it in its entirety, or even veto just parts of the bill.

WFPL

A new poll shows Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear in a dead heat ahead of next month’s gubernatorial election.

The same polling firm showed Bevin trailing Beshear by eight percentage points last December.

Now, 46 percent of likely voters say they’ll vote for Bevin, 46 percent say they’ll vote for Beshear and 7 percent are undecided.

Ryland Barton/WFPL

  Kentucky Commissioner of Education Wayne Lewis says it is not within the Kentucky Department of Education’s authority to investigate political emails sent from a private individual to teachers’ professional email accounts.

On Wednesday, the Kentucky Education Association called for Lewis or the Kentucky Board of Education to lead a state investigation into political emails teachers in several rural Kentucky school districts received at work. 

Liam Niemeyer

Republican Governor Matt Bevin and his opponent, Democrat Attorney General Andy Beshear continued to battle over contentious campaign issues at this fall’s first gubernatorial debate Thursday in Paducah. 

wkms.org

 

 

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin is running for re-election this year. He’s got three primary challengers and low approval ratings after a series of gaffes and insults towards public school teachers. But he also has widespread name recognition and economic development successes to hang his hat on.

When he took office in late 2015, Bevin became only the third Republican governor of Kentucky since World War II. The election represented a sea change in Kentucky politics, which had been dominated by Democrats for much of state history.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin has crafted a new version of the pension bill he vetoed last month and is expected to call a special session for lawmakers to consider the issue soon.

The measure is similar to the one that Bevin rejected last month. It allows regional universities and agencies like health departments to exit the state’s pension system to avoid a spike in the amount of money they have to contribute to it.

Courier Journal

Gov. Matt Bevin met with members of the Kentucky Poor People’s campaign after the group rallied outside his office for nearly an hour on Tuesday.

The Poor People’s Campaign was protesting an emergency regulation signed by Bevin that limits visitors’ access to the Capitol.

But in the 20-minute meeting with Bevin, the group’s leaders elevated issues like school shootings, health care and voting rights for people who have felony records.

Wikimedia Commons

A group of Kentuckians is again suing the federal government over the re-approval of Gov. Matt Bevin’s changes to the Medicaid program.

Kentucky.com

A judge has struck down changes made to Kentucky’s pension systems earlier this year. The ruling states that lawmakers violated the state constitution by rushing the bill to passage in a matter of hours. 

The challenge is the latest in a series of legal disputes between Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear and Republican Gov. Matt Bevin. 

This week in Kentucky politics, speculation flared that Kentucky’s new education leaders would try to take over Louisville’s public school district. Plus, a judge ruled that Attorney General Andy Beshear  can sue the governor over the pension bill that was signed into law earlier this month. Capitol reporter Ryland Barton has this week’s edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled. 

Kentucky.com

Lawmakers return to Frankfort this week for the 2018 General Assembly and are slated to make changes to the state’s pension systems, craft a new two-year budget and consider a variety of other legislation.

This will be the first time in Kentucky history that a budget will be written by a Republican-led legislature and governor. 
 

On WHAS Radio’s Terry Meiners Show, Bevin said major cuts are likely across state government. 

Kentucky's Projected Shortfall Deepens, Cuts Coming

Dec 15, 2017

A panel of economists has revised downward its prediction of how much Kentucky will make in tax revenue by the end of the fiscal year in June and Gov. Matt Bevin is expected to make cuts to state spending soon

The Consensus Forecasting Group on Friday predicted that the state will be $156.1 million short of initial projections. 
State Budget Director John Chilton said he expects Gov. Matt Bevin will make cuts to state spending before the end of the calendar year to help avert a budget shortfall.

via Facebook "live"

Gov. Matt Bevin said the man he has appointed to oversee the state’s adoption and foster care system is being unfairly criticized.

Bevin tapped Dan Dumas, a senior vice president with Louisville Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, to be Kentucky’s adoption “czar” earlier this month.

Democrats have criticized the appointment for its high pay and Dumas’ lack of experience working in the adoption system.


kyforward.com

A one and a third billion dollar investment in Kentucky’s automotive industry is not changing a legislative leader’s mind about the need for broad tax reform. Toyota officials announced Monday plans to spend the funds over 5 years to revitalize design, engineering, and production at the Scott County plant.   


Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration has dropped its efforts to shut down Kentucky’s last abortion clinic pending the outcome of a federal lawsuit aimed at preventing its closure.

An agreement between lawyers for the Republican governor and the Louisville clinic, EMW Women’s Surgical Center, has been submitted to U.S. District Judge Greg Stivers, who has not yet signed off on it.

As part of the agreement, Bevin’s administration agreed to renew EMW’s license until the federal suit is resolved.

Stu Johnson

In an extremely rare Saturday meeting of the Kentucky General Assembly, legislators took final action on abortion and labor-related bills.  Both the House and Senate voted to prohibit abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy and require an ultrasound prior to any abortion. 

During debate on the ultrasound measure, Lexington Senator Reggie Thomas said some Kentucky children face extreme trauma every day.  “We see children that are unattended.  We see children who will suffer. We see children who are harmed and permanently damaged.”

kentucky.com

Kentucky’s highest court says the state’s Republican governor cannot cut the budgets of public colleges and universities without the approval of the state legislature.

The 5-2 ruling by the state Supreme Court reverses a lower court ruling that said Gov. Matt Bevin had the authority to order public colleges and universities not to spend all of the money the state legislature gave them.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear appealed, arguing Bevin’s order was illegal. A majority of the court agreed on Thursday, saying Bevin does not have that authority.

University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky’s Center for Excellence in Rural Health is one of 38 organizations to receive funding from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. The $1 million grant will be used to help children in Appalachia get the health insurance they need, as well as provide to families that are eligible to coverage. Many Kentucky families are unaware they qualify for healthcare coverage so do not look into signing up for them or their children. This is especially difficult in rural parts of Eastern Kentucky, where healthcare providers have a hard time gaining access to those that need it most.


FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky's Democratic attorney general has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether Gov. Matt Bevin has the authority to cut college and university budgets without the approval of the state legislature.

A state judge ruled last week that Bevin does have the authority to order public colleges and universities not to spend all of the money the state legislature gave them. Attorney General Andy Beshear is appealing the decision, arguing it gives the governor's office too much power.

bizjournal.com

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says it could be several months before a final state court ruling in his lawsuit against Governor Matt Bevin. 

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate ruled Wednesday the governor had proper authority in ordering a two percent reduction in current year funding for public universities and colleges. 

wfpl.org

Gov. Matt Bevin’s newly appointed commissioner of revenue left his last job, at Lexmark International, after the Lexington-based technology company found a host of accounting errors and declared its internal financial controls to be deficient and in need of remediation.

Bevin named Daniel Bork to the Department of Revenue job on Monday. In a news release, Bevin’s office said Bork “recently retired” as Lexmark’s vice president of tax, a job he had held since 2001. Bork’s LinkedIn profile says he worked there until September.

Tom Loftus / Courier Journal

Matt Bevin has taken the oath to become the 62nd governor of Kentucky during a private ceremony just after midnight in the state Capitol.

Bevin succeeds Democrat Steve Beshear, who could not seek re-election because of term limits. Bevin is the state's ninth Republican governor in its 223-year history and the second since 1971.

A full day of events is scheduled for Tuesday, including a worship service, a parade and a public swearing-in ceremony on the Capitol steps.

In Last Hours in Office, Beshear Pardons 201

Dec 8, 2015
wfpl.org

As his term came to an end, Gov. Steve Beshear issued 201 pardons to people convicted in Kentucky of a variety of offenses, including several sent to prison for drug crimes or for committing crimes against abusive partners.

Beshear also granted six commutations, reducing a sentence to time already served in jail.

Charles Bertram / Lexington Herald Leader

On Tuesday, Matt Bevin will be sworn in as the 62nd governor of Kentucky.  His inauguration will include an early morning worship service, cannon fire signaling the start of a two-hour parade, a public swearing-in ceremony and a “grand march” in the state capitol rotunda.

Event organizers say veterans will play a key role in the parade, and the official ceremonies will be “laid back” in a style to reflect that Gov.-elect Bevin is a “casual-type guy.”

wfpl.org

Gov. Steve Beshear has signed an executive order restoring voting rights to non-violent felons in Kentucky who have completed their sentences.

Beshear made the announcement Tuesday in Frankfort. The executive order excludes people convicted of bribery, sex crimes or treason, he said.

Post Election GOP Rally

Nov 16, 2015
courier-journal.com

Fresh off a successful election season, Kentucky Republicans say they are dead-set on getting the entire state government under GOP control.

Party leaders met Saturday in Louisville to discuss next year’s election, plan for the looming presidential caucus and instate new chairman Mac Brown.

The newly elected state leaders, led by Governor-elect Matt Bevin, were in attendance.

Ryland Barton

The leader of the religious ministry constructing a massive replica of Noah’s Ark in Northern Kentucky says he won’t ask Governor-elect Matt Bevin to approve tax incentives for the project.

Instead, Answers in Genesis chief executive Ken Ham said he wants a federal court to rule on whether state tourism officials were right to decline more than $18 million in tax incentives for the project.

Dylan Buell / Courier Journal

Governor-elect Matt Bevin on Friday announced the early priorities of his administration: dismantling the state-run health insurance exchange and removing county clerks’ names from marriage licenses.

In his first news conference since the election on Tuesday, Bevin said he hopes to have Kentucky’s health insurance exchange, Kynect, dismantled by the end of next year.

“It adds no value,” he said.

Bevin said Kynect  is “redundant” because the state can instead participate in the federal health insurance exchange. But if the state switches to the federal exchange, Kentuckians will have to pay a 3.5 percent surcharge on insurance policies. Since the Affordable Care Act was implemented in 2013, Kentuckians pay a 1 percent surcharge that funds the Kynect.

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