governor

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fulfilled another of his “week one” campaign promises on Thursday by signing an executive order to automatically restore voting rights to people with nonviolent felonies who have completed their sentences. He estimated the move would allow more than 140,000 people to vote.

There are an estimated 312,000 disenfranchised voters in Kentucky, which equates to about 7 percent of the population.

Beshear/Coleman2019

This interview was originally published on May 23, 2019.

The Attorney General and 2019 Democratic Gubernatorial candidate tells WEKU's Wendy Barnett his plans for the months leading up to the fall elections in this in-depth exclusive interview.

Incumbent Governor Matt Bevin spoke to WEKU here

You can also stay informed with our WEKU App.  

  Before a packed crowd at Northern Kentucky University Tuesday night, Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear capped off a series of five televised debates, making their final pitches ahead of next week’s election.

During the debate that aired on WLWT, both candidates said they would make it a priority to address the crumbling Brent-Spence Bridge that connects Covington to Cincinnati.

The issue has been a focal point for northern Kentuckians for years but has failed to get funding from the Ohio or Kentucky governments.

Liam Niemeyer

Republican Governor Matt Bevin and his opponent, Democrat Attorney General Andy Beshear continued to battle over contentious campaign issues at this fall’s first gubernatorial debate Thursday in Paducah. 

Primary Election Round Up: Who Won? What's Next?

May 22, 2019

  Governor

Incumbent Republican Gov. Matt Bevin has won a closer-than-expected primary election and will face Attorney General Andy Beshear during this year’s race to be Kentucky’s next governor.

The two men have been political rivals since taking office more than three years ago with Beshear, a Democrat, filing a series of lawsuits against Bevin over executive orders and a controversial pension bill. For more, check out the full story by Ryland Barton.

Kentucky Democratic Party

With about a month to go before Kentucky’s primary elections, all three major Democratic candidates for governor appeared together on stage for the first time on Thursday.

During a forum held by Louisville’s Rotary Club, candidates differed only slightly in their stances on a wide range of issues including preserving Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion, shoring up public education and allowing casino gambling to generate revenue for the state’s ailing pension systems.

But the candidates are still trying to set themselves apart.

Northern Kentucky Businessman Files For Governor

Jan 14, 2019
William Woods/Twitter

The Republican primary for Kentucky governor is now a three-man race. William 
Woods of Grant County filed paperwork with the Secretary of State's Office today.

Woods is a businessman from northern Kentucky who ran unsuccessfully for the state House in 2012.

He’s seeking the GOP nomination for governor alongside running mate Justin Miller of Florence. Woods’ campaign platform includes legalizing marijuana and casino gaming. He’s also in favor of keeping state employee pensions at full funding while eliminating pensions for state lawmakers.

Jacob Payne

  Former State Auditor Adam Edelen is the third Democrat to launch a bid for Kentucky governor.

During an announcement in Lexington, Edelen said as governor he would focus on fixing the state’s public education system, protecting health coverage and generating new revenue for the state’s cash-strapped budget.

Edelen depicted himself as a new direction for Kentucky Democrats, saying that he is an alternative to “the stale scent of incrementalism and nostalgia.”

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says he will be speaking to a Fancy Farm crowd in August about his plan to restore  “honesty and decency to government” if he is elected governor in 2019.

Beshear outlined his message for the annual political rally as he spoke outside Paducah-Tilghman High School Tuesay during a statewide tour this week. Beshear says he believes Governor Matt Bevin’s administration has been divisive.

Updated at 4:30 p.m.

Former Gov. Julian Carroll says he won’t step down from his seat in the Kentucky Senate after allegations that he groped and asked a man for sex.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports that Carroll said he would not resign despite calls from his fellow Senate Democrats to do so.

Former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear on Eastern Standard

Jun 28, 2017
John Hingsbergen

Former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear is our guest for this week's special edition of Eastern Standard.

Gov. Beshear joins us to discuss his new book, People Over Politics and the issues of politics and civic life he raises in the book.


Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s been impressed with Trump’s picks for cabinet positions and is encouraged by the administration’s pledge to cut federal regulations.

Bevin took part in a panel discussion Thursday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC in Washington.

He also touted his own initiative to cut bureaucratic red tape in Frankfort.

“We’ve pledged to cutting 30 percent of all the red tape in Kentucky in the next three years,” Bevin said. “We have 130,000 rules. Pretty confident that we can govern everybody with 90-something-thousand.”

Ky.gov

The future of performance-based funding for Kentucky's universities is now back in the hands of the governor and state lawmakers. Members of Eastern Kentucky University's Board of Regents received an update Monday. 

Kentucky State University on Eastern Standard

Feb 15, 2016

The president of Kentucky State University says his institution cannot withstand funding cuts in Governor Matt Bevin’s budget.

On this week’s EST, we’ll discuss the 130-year-old historically black college, it’s past and current role in the Commonwealth and it’s future in light of the proposed cuts.

Guests:

2015 Election Results

Nov 3, 2015

WEKU brings you complete coverage of the 2015 Election throughout the evening. 

Stay with us for hourly updates from NPR followed by reports from Kentucky Public Radio at four minutes past each hour, starting at 7:04.

A day before the May 17 primary, the Kentucky Democratic Party and Republican gubernatorial candidate David Williams are trading barbs in a likely preview of the general election. Williams is the favorite in the race against Louisville businessman Phil Moffett and Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw. Hoping to clip his turnout, the KDP launched a 30-second YouTube video slamming the state Senate president for refusing to release his tax returns, suggesting he has something to hide.

Most politicians steer clear from discussions about ‘taxes.’ That’s particularly the case if the talk is about a new tax or a tax increase.  Still, ongoing concerns over Kentucky’s budget have some candidates in Tuesday’s primary talking about potential reforms.

Lt. Governors: Are They Expendable?

May 13, 2011

Imagine a job where the only function is taking-over if the boss quits, is fired, gets sick or even worse.  That pretty much describes Kentucky’s lieutenant governor.  Four people, one Democrat and three Republicans, are campaigning for that job.  And, as WEKU’s Charles Compton reports, their duties, will in large part, depend on who’s elected governor…