epa

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today said it will move forward with a series of actions to regulate toxic fluorinated chemicals, including proposing drinking water limits by the end of this year.

In its long-awaited “PFAS Action Plan,” EPA laid out a series of actions to address the widespread contamination of fluorinated PFAS chemicals.

EPA Rule Rollback Aimed at Boosting Coal Plant Development

Dec 5, 2018
OVR

  The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce it is rolling back Obama-era regulations that required newly-built coal plants to strictly limit carbon emissions.

Industry advocates argued the rule made it nearly impossible to build new coal plants because it required the installation of expensive carbon capture technology.

But experts say it’s unlikely that the EPA’s rollback will reverse the trend.

epa.gov / United States Environmental Protection Agency

  The EPA proposed the so-called Affordable Clean Energy rule back in August.

The rule is more broad than its predecessor, the Clean Power Plan, which aimed to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

It puts the onus on states to come up with individual plans to reduce emissions on a plant by plant basis. For example, the rule urges states to help coal-fired power plants install technologies to reduce emissions.

Creative Commons

Environmental groups are challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s new deadlines for the closure of the country’s unlined coal ash ponds, which gave power plants an extra 18 months to close their ponds if they’re polluting groundwater. 

The pollution comes from coal ash, the waste leftover from burning coal for energy. It often includes carcinogens and neurotoxins. 

Earthjustice attorney Tom Cmar filed the petition for review in the D.C. Court of Appeals on Monday. He says the rules don’t adequately protect the public from environmental harm. 

Toxic 'Teflon' Chemicals On EPA Regulatory Agenda

Sep 6, 2018
Parkerburg News & Sentinel

Environmental Protection Agency officials told a Congressional panel Thursday that the agency will announce by the end of the year whether it will take the next step to regulate a group of toxic fluorinated chemicals found in some water systems in the Ohio Valley.

EPA Administrator Faces Questions Over C-8 Report

May 16, 2018
Kentucky.com

 

EPA Administer Scott Pruitt today faced questions over recently released emails that show White House and EPA officials attempted to delay a new federal standard for toxic chemicals in drinking water. Brittany Patterson reports the chemicals includ the compound C-8 and other similar substances detected in several water systems in the Ohio Valley, 

At a Senate hearing, Republican West Virginia Senator Shelley Moore Capito pressed Pruitt on the emails.

Trump's EPA Pick Questioned In Confirmation Hearing

Jan 19, 2017
West Virginia Public Broadcasting/Associated Press

President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt faced questions from Senators in his confirmation hearing Wednesday. 


Lexington Launching New Water Tank Era

Aug 29, 2016
Stu Johnson WEKU News

A massive overhaul of Lexington's sewer system includes meeting capacity demands for new developments.  It’s a project rooted in fixing problems while providing for new sewer connections.

As part of a federal mandate to upgrade the system, Lexington must meet standards in the "Sanitary Sewer Capacity Assurance Program." Council members were briefed on a CAP audit last week.

lge-ku.com

In the final weeks of Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration, state regulators and legislators haven’t closed the door on the possibility that Kentucky will create its own plan to comply with upcoming federal carbon dioxide regulations.

Len Peters, secretary of the Energy and Environment Cabinet, spoke Tuesday before a special legislative task force made up of lawmakers and industry representatives.

epa.gov

The Environmental Protection Agency’s final draft of the Clean Power Plan includes stricter regulations than originally proposed. 

J. Tyler Franklin / Louisville Public Media

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway says he’ll again sue the Environmental Protection Agency over new federal carbon dioxide rules. 

Focus on Business: Fixing Lexington's Sewer Problems

Nov 11, 2013

For years, hard rains in Lexington have caused sanitary and storm water sewer systems to overflow into streams and even homes.

These illegal “Sanitary Sewer Overflows,” are the basis of a 2006 lawsuit filed against the city by the Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Kentucky. A 2011 Consent Decree gives Lexington 10 years to fix the problem. 

The agreement requires the city to establish a Capacity Assurance Program (CAP). It was developed by a seven-member task force that produced 19 recommendations for a plan submitted early this year to the EPA.