Bevin

UPDATE 4:27 p.m.: The state Senate voted on Wednesday to override Gov. Matt Bevin’s veto of “Tim’s Law.” The vote was 35-1, with Republican Sen. Wil Schroder of Wilder voting against.

The override now moves to the state House, which has until Thursday to consider it.

EARLIER:

Kentucky senators are considering overriding a veto by Gov. Matt Bevin of a bill – known as “Tim’s Law” — that would allow a court to order involuntary outpatient mental health treatment.

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin has vetoed three bills and a portion of a fourth bill passed by the new GOP-controlled legislature. 

Ahead of President Trump’s executive order that will begin rolling back power plant emission rules, Gov. Matt Bevin predicted that the move will bring back jobs to Kentucky’s coal fields.

“We just are being suffocated by overregulation,” Bevin said Tuesday morning on WVHU, a radio station in Huntington, West Virginia. “And regulation that’s frankly not based on science, it’s not based on anything where it’s been proven in any way shape or form that it actually helps anyone.”

Stu Johnson

 

Hundreds of workers at Kentucky’s juvenile detention facilities will soon see a 20 percent hike in pay.  Governor Matt Bevin made the announcement Thursday at the Fayette Regional Juvenile Detention Center. 

The governor said the roughly $2 million dollars to cover pay raises comes from a number of state departments.

 He said taxpayers “have a responsibility to do right” by the workers.The largest salary increase will go to some 460 entry-level workers.  Others working in juvenile detention facilities will also see higher pay. 

Because of employee turnover rates that exceed 100 percent, Justice Secretary John Tilley said it costs the taxpayer more to pay less when it comes to youth worker salaries. 

Over the past few years, there have been numerous documented instances of contaminated water leaching from a coal ash pond in Central Kentucky into groundwater and directly into Herrington Lake. Now, state regulators are investigating high levels of selenium in the lake’s fish, and they have fined utility Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities $25,000.

After a lengthy debate and rushed legislative process, the state House of Representatives has passed a charter schools bill. The measure passed 56-39.

The legislation now heads to the state Senate, where it’s expected to pass.

Under the bill, private organizations and community members can apply to open up a charter school. Local school districts and the mayors of Lexington and Louisville would be charged with approving or denying the charters, though denials could be appealed to the state board of education.

Ag.Ky.Gov

A controversial bill affecting the operation of the state attorney general's office won approval in the Kentucky House today and is expected to get a favorable reception as it moves to a vote in the Senate.

In addition to requiring the attorney general to explain why outside counsel is needed, the bill sets a cap at $20 million dollars that an attorney can recover in any given case. 

Providence Representative Jim Gooch said that can mean more dollars for taxpayers in large civil cases, “The more you have to pay one of these attorneys, the less money you’re going to get.”


Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s been impressed with Trump’s picks for cabinet positions and is encouraged by the administration’s pledge to cut federal regulations.

Bevin took part in a panel discussion Thursday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC in Washington.

He also touted his own initiative to cut bureaucratic red tape in Frankfort.

“We’ve pledged to cutting 30 percent of all the red tape in Kentucky in the next three years,” Bevin said. “We have 130,000 rules. Pretty confident that we can govern everybody with 90-something-thousand.”

A state Senate committee has advanced a bill that would give the governor of Kentucky broad powers to reorganize university boards or remove board members if he or she believes there’s cause to do so.

The legislation would also allow the governor to replace the most recent members appointed to university boards in order to make the panels compliant with racial and political requirements also mandated by the legislation.

Ky.gov

The Kentucky General Assembly is looking at ways to improve foster care and adoption, although the real push for reforms is likely a year away.

Gov. Matt Bevin is calling for change when it comes to state adoptions and foster care.  He raised the issue during his State of the Commonwealth address last week.


New Leader Named To Kentucky Commission on Women

Feb 13, 2017
Ky.gov

The new chairwoman of the Kentucky Commission on Women is stepping into a brand new role, different than her position as head of an advanced technology firm.

Danette Wilder is president of SealingLife Technology. She said one goal of the Commission this year will be to influence the lives of women in areas like education, entrepreneurship, health and well-being.  Wilder said pay equity remains an issue.


governor.ky.gov

Gov. Matt Bevin is calling upon the Kentucky General Assembly to make “bold, hard, decisions” when it comes to tax reform. 

During Wednesday State of the Commonwealth speech, Bevin said tax reform and further steps to reduce the state’s $82 million pension deficit need to be done together in a special session this year.  Bevin said some 300 tax loopholes deserve attention.

 “We exempt more income in Kentucky than we take in.  That’s going to have to change, ” Bevin said.


Ky.gov

The future of performance-based funding for Kentucky's universities is now back in the hands of the governor and state lawmakers. Members of Eastern Kentucky University's Board of Regents received an update Monday. 

Kentucky Public Radio

Kentucky's attorney general and state auditor will no longer be able to nominate members of the Executive Branch Ethics Commission. That’s under a new executive order from Republican Gov.  Matt Bevin.

  

 

The governor appoints the members of the commission, which investigates allegations of state ethics code violations in the state's executive branch.  

Judge Rules Bevin Can Cut College, University Budgets

May 18, 2016

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky judge has ruled Republican Gov. Matt Bevin can cut the budgets of public colleges and universities without the approval of the state legislature. 

Franklin County Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate says two state laws allow Bevin to reduce allotments for public colleges and universities. Wingate ruled while the governor's powers are usually confined to the state constitution, the legislature can give the governor additional powers by passing laws. He said Bevin's cuts of nearly $18 million to colleges and universities this year are not improper.

Gov. Bevin Appoints Inspector General to Assist in Beshear Investigation

Apr 21, 2016
U.S. Marshal Service

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin has appointed an inspector general to look into potential illegal activities by the governor’s immediate predecessor. 

A former U.S. Marshal will assist with the investigation of allegations against former Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear.   

Gov. Bevin appointed Kenneth F. Bohac as the inspector general for the Finance Cabinet.

Bohac is a 21-year veteran of the U.S. Marshals Service. President Barack Obama appointed him U.S. marshal for the Central District of Illinois in 2010.

Kentucky State University on Eastern Standard

Feb 15, 2016

The president of Kentucky State University says his institution cannot withstand funding cuts in Governor Matt Bevin’s budget.

On this week’s EST, we’ll discuss the 130-year-old historically black college, it’s past and current role in the Commonwealth and it’s future in light of the proposed cuts.

Guests:

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