Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a producer who works with Morning Edition and NPR.org, coordinating with radio and digital media staff to create Web features that complement stories heard on-air. He also frequently writes original Web pieces.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to writing for its World Cup 2010 blog. Chappell's assignments have included being the lead Web producer on NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as being the Web liaison and producer of the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps project.

Chappell was an integral part of the team that executed a comprehensive redesign of NPR's Web site in 2009. One year later, the site won its first Peabody and the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award, among others.

Drawing from his experience in improving NPR's storytelling ability, he trains both digital media and radio staff in using NPR's digital tools.

Other shows he has worked with include Fresh Air, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation and Piano Jazz with Marilyn McPartland.

Prior to joining NPR in 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling regions from Asia and Africa to Europe and Latin America.

During the intensive early months of the Iraq War, he coordinated packages and live shots out of Qatar, Israel and Australia. During the war, he set up live interviews and brought in packages to supply content to CNN's global networks.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as Editor-in-Chief of the Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

Chappell's prior work included producing Web pages and editing digital video for CNNSI.com, as well as editing and producing news and features at CNN.com. His entry to CNN came via the network's central library, where he often manned the reference desk.

Chappell's entry into national journalism came after years of writing about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies. A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

Dutch police have arrested a man they call the main suspect in a shooting that left three people dead and five others wounded on a tram in the city of Utrecht on Monday. A motive for the shooting remains unclear; police have said they were investigating a "possible terrorist motive" for the attack, but reports have also emerged that the shooting might have its roots in a family dispute.

An intense winter storm — a "bomb cyclone" of snow and wind — has stranded drivers and shut down interstates in the Rockies and Plains regions of the U.S.

Colorado's National Guard said Thursday that it has now rescued 75 people and two dogs, after checking on 148 vehicles stuck in the storm.

Updated at 5:48 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it is temporarily grounding all Boeing 737 Max aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory.

The announcement Wednesday afternoon follows decisions by many other countries to ground the planes after 157 people died in Sunday's crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8.

Bowing to weeks of protests, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has reversed his decision to run for a fifth term and says he will not seek re-election. But the 82-year-old leader stopped short of stepping down and has delayed elections set for next month.

"I particularly understand the message given by youth, in terms of anxiety and ambition for their own future and that of the country," Bouteflika said in a message published by the Algeria Press Service.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Federal officials have charged dozens of well-heeled parents, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, in what the Justice Department says was a multimillion-dollar scheme to cheat college admissions standards. The parents allegedly paid a consultant who then fabricated academic and athletic credentials and arranged bribes to help get their children into prestigious universities.

The U.S. has apparently warned Germany that if Chinese tech companies such as Huawei help build the country's new 5G telecom infrastructure, U.S. agencies might not share as much intelligence with the German government as they currently do.

That's the gist of a letter U.S. Ambassador Richard A. Grenell recently sent to German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier, according to The Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is drawing criticism for saying that Israel is "the national state, not of all its citizens, but only of the Jewish people." The comment prompted many people — including Israel's president and the star of Wonder Woman — to defend Israel's Palestinian Arab minority.

Palestinian Arab citizens are about a fifth of Israel's population and often face discrimination and accusations of disloyalty.

Updated at 9:20 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it plans to require a series of design changes to the Boeing 737 Max fleet after a pair of fatal plane crashes including one Sunday in Ethiopia that killed all 157 people on board. Airlines in other countries have grounded their Boeing 737 Max jets.

As NPR's Russell Lewis reports, the FAA plans to order the changes by next month.

Chelsea Manning, the former Army private, is back in U.S. federal custody, jailed over her refusal to testify before a grand jury in a case involving WikiLeaks and Julian Assange.

Judge Claude Hilton of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia ordered Manning to jail Friday "after a brief hearing in which Manning confirmed she has no intention of testifying," the Associated Press reports.

Hilton said Manning must stay in custody until she either changes her mind about testifying or the grand jury finishes its work.

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

The SpaceX Crew Dragon hit its splashdown time of 8:45 a.m. ET right on target Friday, landing in the Atlantic Ocean after undocking from the International Space Station and re-entering Earth's atmosphere.

The successful test and splashdown is "an amazing achievement in American history," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, who called the SpaceX flight the "dawning of a new era in American human space flight."

The U.S. government compiled dossiers on journalists who reported on the 2018 migrant caravan as well as activists and others involved in the event — and agents used the database to target people for secondary screenings, according to a San Diego TV station, which says a source in the Department of Homeland Security shared proof of the interagency project focused on the U.S. Southwest border.

A court in Lyon, France, has convicted Cardinal Philippe Barbarin — one of France's most prominent Catholic officials — of not reporting accusations of deprivation or sexual abuse of Boy Scouts by a priest in his diocese.

After the ruling, Barbarin said he would offer his resignation to Pope Francis. Separately, his lawyer said he also would appeal the court's guilty verdict.

Everyone who had been reported missing after violent tornadoes struck eastern Alabama Sunday is now accounted for and authorities said Wednesday that they don't expect the death toll of 23 people to change. The mission is now about recovery, Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones said.

The money was there — it was just locked away. At least that's what the QuadrigaCX cryptocurrency exchange had been saying, before an auditor revealed it had finally accessed digital wallets set up by Quadriga's late CEO Gerald Cotten — and that instead of holding $137 million, the wallets were empty, drained in 2018.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Terrence Mercadal and Jared Robinet — the police officers who shot and killed Stephon Clark last March — will not face charges. The two officers fired on Clark, who was unarmed, after a foot chase that ended in his grandmother's backyard.

The Nobel Foundation says it will award two Nobel Prizes in Literature this fall, after canceling last year's prize due to chaos from a scandal over sexual assault allegations against the husband of a Swedish Academy member. Last year, organizers said the academy had too few members and too many problems to anoint a winner.

The Nobel group said Tuesday that enough changes have been made to pick new winners with confidence, promising a rebound from 2018, when the literary prize was not awarded for the first time since World War II.

The U.S. officially shut down its Jerusalem Consulate General on Monday, severing a connection that for decades served as a direct link between Palestinians and Washington. The consulate's work is being folded into the new U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem — a move Palestinian officials have condemned.

The long-running consulate is being replaced by a Palestinian Affairs Unit that will operate in the same historic complex on Gerson Agron Street, several miles north of the embassy that opened last year to fanfare and controversy.

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

After President Trump seemingly absolved North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in the death of American college student Otto Warmbier, the Ohio man's parents say they disagree and that "Kim and his evil regime are responsible."

The issue arose in Vietnam on Thursday when Trump was asked at a news conference if he had talked to Kim — whom he has called a "friend" — about Warmbier, who died in 2017 shortly after his release from more than a year of detention in North Korea. Trump said he had asked Kim about it.

YouTube is disabling comments on millions of videos featuring minors, responding to accusations that pedophiles use comments to network and share links. The move comes a week after Disney, Fortnite maker Epic Games and other companies pulled their ads from YouTube.

YouTube says it has already disabled comments on "tens of millions of videos that could be subject to predatory behavior," and that it will broaden that effort in coming months to include more videos that feature young minors.

A graduate student's innovative and potentially lucrative idea for getting drugs to the eye is at the center of a lawsuit filed by the University of Missouri system against a former pharmaceutical professor. The school says Ashim Mitra patented the student's idea and sold it in a deal potentially worth millions.

Guerneville, Calif., "is officially an island," the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office said after heavy rains caused the Russian River to rise nearly 14 feet above its flood stage Wednesday night. The high waters isolated both Guerneville and nearby Monte Rio.

The Russian River's flood stage in Guerneville is 32 feet. But it reached nearly 46 feet Wednesday night, and the National Weather Service predicted that major flood conditions will continue Thursday because it will take time for all that water to recede.

Updated at 9:03 p.m. ET

Leaders of the United Methodist Church have rejected the One Church Plan, a measure that would have eased restrictions on LGBTQ clergy and same-sex marriages, with delegates voting against it at a special session of the church's General Conference.

On Tuesday afternoon, delegates from around the world voted 438 to 384 to pass what was called the Traditional Plan, which maintains the church's rules.

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May says she's open to the possibility of delaying Britain's exit from the European Union that's planned for March 29, publicly accepting that option for the first time as she promised lawmakers a chance to vote on the question.

May announced the strategy shift as Britain stares down an important deadline, with less than five weeks before its scheduled exit from the EU.

Addressing the House of Commons, May offered three new commitments:

  • To hold a "meaningful vote" on embracing an EU exit deal by March 12;

Updated at 5:46 p.m. ET

The Florida state attorney's office in Palm Beach says New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft has been charged with two counts of soliciting prostitution, days after police alleged surveillance video had caught Kraft during two visits to the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Fla.

State Attorney Dave Aronberg said at a news conference Monday that Kraft, a resident of Massachusetts who also has a home in Palm Beach, is among 25 people facing first-degree misdemeanor charges of soliciting another to commit prostitution.

A county judge in Kansas has dismissed murder and other criminal charges against the designers and operators of a 17-story waterslide that killed a 10-year-old boy, saying that a grand jury was shown evidence that was prejudicial.

Caleb Schwab was decapitated in 2016, when the raft he was riding on the Verruckt waterslide went airborne and hit a metal pole supporting a safety net at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kan. Two women who were in the raft with the boy were injured.

The world's best breakdancers could compete for Olympic gold medals at the 2024 Summer Games in Paris, if the event's organizers succeed in getting the hip-hop dance style recognized as an Olympic sport.

As Paris organizers proposed adding breakdancing to the roster, the International Olympic Committee said the idea fits with its goal of making the Olympics "gender-balanced, more youth-focused and more urban."

Updated at 6:40 a.m. Friday

You might think the world's biggest bee would be easy to find. But that's not the case: Until recently, the last time anyone had reported seeing a Wallace's giant bee living in the wild was in 1981. That changed in January, when the rare bee was spotted on an island of Indonesia.

A German court says gunmaker Heckler & Koch skirted the law when it exported thousands of military-grade assault rifles to Mexican states struggling to cope with violent drug cartels, hitting the large company with a fine of 3.7 million euros ($4.2 million).

As part of the ruling, two former H&K employees were given suspended prison sentences of 17 and 22 months. Prosecutors had initially put five former employees on trial and sought prison sentences for three of them.

Teenager Nicholas Sandmann's family is suing The Washington Post, saying it targeted the Covington Catholic High School student and defamed him for political purposes when it reported on a January encounter on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial between Sandmann and Native American activist Nathan Phillips.

We know their names, and where they were. But no one has given a public explanation for what several former elite U.S. service members were doing in Haiti — and why they were driving without license plates, carrying an assortment of automatic rifles, drones and other gear.

The men face charges of being part of a criminal conspiracy, the Haitian Times reports, after being intercepted at a routine police roadblock.

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