Bevin

Grants Support Marshall County Recovery Efforts

Sep 3, 2018
Marshall County High School

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin and the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet have approved additional grants to support victims and families affected by the Marshall County High School shooting.

The two grants come through the federal Victims of Crime Act. The Marshall County Board of Education will receive more than $260,000 dollars for its Marshall Strong Recovery Project.

This will pay for a coordinator to develop and oversee a comprehensive recovery plan. More than $220,000  will go to support victim services during the trial of the accused shooter.

Kentucky.com

A federal court has dismissed a lawsuit filed by Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin against 16 Kentucky residents. Those residents had earlier sued Bevin in a separate court, asking a judge to declare Bevin’s Medicaid changes illegal.

On Monday, Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky dismissed Bevin’s lawsuit.

Kentucky.com

A new report says thousands of people across the Commonwealth lost their dental and vision coverage as well as transportation assistance in the recent Medicaid expansion rollbacks .

Ky.gov

A judge has denied Gov. Matt Bevin’s request to reconsider a ruling that struck down changes to Kentucky’s pensions system. 

Franklin County Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd blocked the pension law last month, saying that lawmakers had violated the state Constitution by not following proper procedure when they passed it.

Bevin asked Shepherd to amend his ruling to determine if the pension bill violated the state’s “inviolable contract”—a provision that protects state worker benefits from being tinkered with after they’ve been hired. 
 

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says he will be speaking to a Fancy Farm crowd in August about his plan to restore  “honesty and decency to government” if he is elected governor in 2019.

Beshear outlined his message for the annual political rally as he spoke outside Paducah-Tilghman High School Tuesay during a statewide tour this week. Beshear says he believes Governor Matt Bevin’s administration has been divisive.

Roxanne Scott

More than 6,500 students from across the country — ranging from middle school age to college — are in Louisville this week as part of the annual SkillsUSA conference. It’s a showcase of skilled trades and technical education, and features contests in fields such as plumbing, masonry and carpentry.

This focus on students learning trades is also a priority of the Trump administration. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos toured some of the conference exhibits Thursday with Gov. Matt Bevin.

Kentucky.com

A federal judge on Friday struck down Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s plan to put in place “community engagement” requirements for Medicaid coverage that were set to go into effect in some parts of the state on July 1.

That also includes the entirety of the new program, premiums, co-pays, loss of automatic vision and dental benefits and lock-out periods.

Ky.gov

Governor Matt Bevin is on an economic development trip to Asia this week. The trade mission to Japan and the Republic of Korea will encourage more job creation in Kentucky.

WUKY.Com

Only 32 percent of Kentuckians surveyed this month approved of Republican Governor Matt Bevin’s job performance. Political Science Professor Joel Turner heads the Social Science Research Center at Western Kentucky University, which conducted the poll. He says despite Bevin’s low approval rating, his hardcore supporters appear to appreciate his recent efforts during the General Assembly.

Kycir.org

Gov. Matt Bevin has announced a new website for Kentuckians to find help for drug addiction and search for treatment centers. 

FindHelpNowKY.org has a search engine that allows users to find treatment centers based on location, facility type and type of treatment needed. 

 Bevin has launched an advertising campaign geared towards spreading awareness about the website and opioid addiction. 

We’ve had lots of online response to the story: Bevin to University Boards: Cut Programs That Don’t Fill High-Demand Jobs.          


While AG Beshear Speaks, Gov. Bevin Will Skip Fancy Farm

Jul 5, 2017
Tom Eblen teblen@herald-leader.com

A public clash between Kentucky's two most powerful politicians will have to wait another year.

A spokesman for Matt Bevin says the Republican governor will skip the annual "political speaking" at the Fancy Farm picnic.  


Former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear on Eastern Standard

Jun 28, 2017
John Hingsbergen

Former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear is our guest for this week's special edition of Eastern Standard.

Gov. Beshear joins us to discuss his new book, People Over Politics and the issues of politics and civic life he raises in the book.


U.S. Department of Energy

Paducah, Kentucky, is home to USEC, a Department of Energy uranium enrichment facility that operated for 50 years until being decommissioned in 2013.

Just across the Ohio River lies the Honeywell corporation’s Metropolis Works, the nation’s only uranium conversion plant.


governor.ky.gov

Governor Bevin doesn’t anticipate the special legislative session planned later this year to provide all the tax reform solutions.  

The governor reiterated his intent to call lawmakers back to Frankfort for a tax session before the end of the year. 

But, Bevin says it won’t be a session to end all sessions on tax reform.  “Not everything we would like to get done will get done necessarily in this single session,” said Bevin.  “I mean taxes are an ongoing thing, not only for Kentucky, but for every state, everywhere.  There’s always some moving part.”

lrc.com

Kentucky House lawmakers have voted overwhelmingly to override Republican Gov. Matt Bevin's vetoes of two bills.

As WEKU’s John Hingsbergen reports, the bills concern regulating drones and deciding who gets to spend up to $100 million from a legal settlement with Volkswagen.


UPDATE 4:27 p.m.: The state Senate voted on Wednesday to override Gov. Matt Bevin’s veto of “Tim’s Law.” The vote was 35-1, with Republican Sen. Wil Schroder of Wilder voting against.

The override now moves to the state House, which has until Thursday to consider it.

EARLIER:

Kentucky senators are considering overriding a veto by Gov. Matt Bevin of a bill – known as “Tim’s Law” — that would allow a court to order involuntary outpatient mental health treatment.

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin has vetoed three bills and a portion of a fourth bill passed by the new GOP-controlled legislature. 

Ahead of President Trump’s executive order that will begin rolling back power plant emission rules, Gov. Matt Bevin predicted that the move will bring back jobs to Kentucky’s coal fields.

“We just are being suffocated by overregulation,” Bevin said Tuesday morning on WVHU, a radio station in Huntington, West Virginia. “And regulation that’s frankly not based on science, it’s not based on anything where it’s been proven in any way shape or form that it actually helps anyone.”

Stu Johnson

 

Hundreds of workers at Kentucky’s juvenile detention facilities will soon see a 20 percent hike in pay.  Governor Matt Bevin made the announcement Thursday at the Fayette Regional Juvenile Detention Center. 

The governor said the roughly $2 million dollars to cover pay raises comes from a number of state departments.

 He said taxpayers “have a responsibility to do right” by the workers.The largest salary increase will go to some 460 entry-level workers.  Others working in juvenile detention facilities will also see higher pay. 

Because of employee turnover rates that exceed 100 percent, Justice Secretary John Tilley said it costs the taxpayer more to pay less when it comes to youth worker salaries. 

Over the past few years, there have been numerous documented instances of contaminated water leaching from a coal ash pond in Central Kentucky into groundwater and directly into Herrington Lake. Now, state regulators are investigating high levels of selenium in the lake’s fish, and they have fined utility Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities $25,000.

After a lengthy debate and rushed legislative process, the state House of Representatives has passed a charter schools bill. The measure passed 56-39.

The legislation now heads to the state Senate, where it’s expected to pass.

Under the bill, private organizations and community members can apply to open up a charter school. Local school districts and the mayors of Lexington and Louisville would be charged with approving or denying the charters, though denials could be appealed to the state board of education.

Ag.Ky.Gov

A controversial bill affecting the operation of the state attorney general's office won approval in the Kentucky House today and is expected to get a favorable reception as it moves to a vote in the Senate.

In addition to requiring the attorney general to explain why outside counsel is needed, the bill sets a cap at $20 million dollars that an attorney can recover in any given case. 

Providence Representative Jim Gooch said that can mean more dollars for taxpayers in large civil cases, “The more you have to pay one of these attorneys, the less money you’re going to get.”


Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s been impressed with Trump’s picks for cabinet positions and is encouraged by the administration’s pledge to cut federal regulations.

Bevin took part in a panel discussion Thursday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC in Washington.

He also touted his own initiative to cut bureaucratic red tape in Frankfort.

“We’ve pledged to cutting 30 percent of all the red tape in Kentucky in the next three years,” Bevin said. “We have 130,000 rules. Pretty confident that we can govern everybody with 90-something-thousand.”

A state Senate committee has advanced a bill that would give the governor of Kentucky broad powers to reorganize university boards or remove board members if he or she believes there’s cause to do so.

The legislation would also allow the governor to replace the most recent members appointed to university boards in order to make the panels compliant with racial and political requirements also mandated by the legislation.

Ky.gov

The Kentucky General Assembly is looking at ways to improve foster care and adoption, although the real push for reforms is likely a year away.

Gov. Matt Bevin is calling for change when it comes to state adoptions and foster care.  He raised the issue during his State of the Commonwealth address last week.


New Leader Named To Kentucky Commission on Women

Feb 13, 2017
Ky.gov

The new chairwoman of the Kentucky Commission on Women is stepping into a brand new role, different than her position as head of an advanced technology firm.

Danette Wilder is president of SealingLife Technology. She said one goal of the Commission this year will be to influence the lives of women in areas like education, entrepreneurship, health and well-being.  Wilder said pay equity remains an issue.


governor.ky.gov

Gov. Matt Bevin is calling upon the Kentucky General Assembly to make “bold, hard, decisions” when it comes to tax reform. 

During Wednesday State of the Commonwealth speech, Bevin said tax reform and further steps to reduce the state’s $82 million pension deficit need to be done together in a special session this year.  Bevin said some 300 tax loopholes deserve attention.

 “We exempt more income in Kentucky than we take in.  That’s going to have to change, ” Bevin said.


Ky.gov

The future of performance-based funding for Kentucky's universities is now back in the hands of the governor and state lawmakers. Members of Eastern Kentucky University's Board of Regents received an update Monday. 

Kentucky Public Radio

Kentucky's attorney general and state auditor will no longer be able to nominate members of the Executive Branch Ethics Commission. That’s under a new executive order from Republican Gov.  Matt Bevin.

  

 

The governor appoints the members of the commission, which investigates allegations of state ethics code violations in the state's executive branch.  

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