Like many artists of his generation, singer Ed Reed saw his career interrupted by drug use and incarceration. JazzTimes magazine recently ran a piece on the Narcotic Farm, a prison for addicts in Lexington, Ky., known for the jazz players who performed behind bars. San Quentin, where Reed did his time, also hosted some notorious jazz players, including Art Pepper, Frank Butler and Frank Morgan.

Guitarist and singer John Pizzarelli is one of the hottest acts in jazz today. With his hip, swinging and sophisticated style, he makes music that sounds both classic and thoroughly modern.

Alto saxophone phenom Grace Kelly has recorded with icons Lee Konitz and Phil Woods and is a seasoned road warrior with tour dates around the world. And she's till in her early 20s. She recently added vocalist to her resume.

On this episode of Piano Jazz, composer and keyboardist Herbie Hancock stops by in a program recorded in 1987. The ever-inventive Hancock sticks with the acoustic piano for this set of solos and duets with host Marian McPartland. Hancock performs a mix of his originals — "Dolphin Dance" and "Still Time" — and standards including "Limehouse Blues," "It Never Entered My Mind" and "That Old Black Magic."

Vocalist Veronica Nunn grew up in Little Rock, Ark., absorbing all kinds of music from jazz to funk to gospel. When she moved to New York in 1978, she split her time between Harlem's jazz clubs and the Theology Department at Lehman College.

On this 2008 episode of Piano Jazz, hosted by Marian McPartland, Nunn is accompanied by her husband, pianist Travis Shook. She demonstrates her soulful technique on "One Note Samba" as well as "I'm Old Fashioned."

Bobby Broom didn't begin playing guitar until age 12, but he developed his jazz chops quickly, gaining the attention of the legendary Sonny Rollins. Throughout the years, he's played with Rollins and other notable groups such as Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, and has toured with his own Bobby Broom Trio. He is also a jazz educator in Chicago.

On this episode of Piano Jazz, keyboardist Chuck Leavell joins host Marian McPartland, along with bassist Gary Mazzaroppi and drummer Glenn Davis, for a set which includes tunes from Hoagy Carmichael and The Allman Brothers Band, as well as some Leavell originals.

Born in 1942 in Harlem, Larry Willis grew up around music; jazz was popular in his neighborhood, and closer to home, he had a brother who played piano. As a child, Willis noodled around on the piano that was in the house, but his talent seemed to lie in singing.

Since he first came to New York 30 years ago, pianist and composer Michel Camilo has made a name for himself as an inventive and ferocious jazz player. His amazing skills at the piano, forged at the Dominican Republic's National Conservatory and National Symphony Orchestra — and later, at Mannes and Juilliard in New York — have allowed him to make contributions to the world of classical music as well.

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Ohio Valley ReSource

Jessie Wright/WVPB

The Justice family companies’ difficulties paying taxes over the years are well documented. But tax collectors haven’t been the only ones trying to recover debts from companies once operated by West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice and now in control of his family.

A review of court documents by the Ohio Valley ReSource found at least five cases in which judges ruled that Justice family companies failed to pay suppliers for goods or services.

 

Wikimedia Commons

The commission has for months now been considering a proposal that would roll back its oversight of water pollution control standards along the Ohio River.

The 8-state body says standards set by member states will protect water quality in the Ohio. And the board argues the federal EPA will provide adequate oversight.

But at a meeting Thursday, the committee tasked with making recommendations to the commission said it needed more time.

ORSANCO Director Richard Harrison says thousands of people have weighed in on the proposal.

Rebecca Kiger

After decades of addiction to heroin and prescription opioids, Wendy Crites finally made a clean break.

“For the first time in my life I just wanted to be off of it,” she said from her home in Ranson, West Virginia. “I hit rock bottom.”

Last year the ReSource profiled Crites, a single mother getting by on low-wage jobs during her first year of sobriety.

 

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